On drawing blind:

I have a hard time with the starting sometimes. Okay, all the times. Even if I already know what the first step should be. Even if I’ve already started it the day before – next day, same thing. Walk into my studio, and the fear bugs descend and try and keep me from moving. Ever been there? Yes of course you have.

But! We still get shit done, because there are tools to get past this! Starting rituals are great. Little steps you take daily so that starting is just another step, like putting on your running shoes the second you get out of bed (don’t worry, I’m not that disciplined.) My ritual just underwent a fall shift and I’ve added a really brilliant little exercise I recently stumbled into. In my head I call it double-blind contour drawing. blind contour etc_1

BLIND contour drawing has been one of my favourite exercises since forever. With that one, you draw the contours of your subject, without looking at your paper – not once! The trick is pretending your pencil is actually touching the thing in front of you as you move your eyes around it. This is great for loosening up and subjugating your doubt monster, since there’s no option to draw the object the “right”. It’s also a really beautiful way to observe and quiet.

double Blind contour blog post_4
(I suspect this was a leaf, since I don’t own any birds)

But what’s double-blind contour drawing? The next logical step, of course – close your eyes entirely! Every morning, and sometimes before every new task, I do double-blind contour therapy. I start by choosing the first task to work on for that day, item 1 on my intention list. Then, I locate paper and close my eyes. Instead of following the contours of an object out in the real world, I visualize the project I am starting, just that first little minute part of it, and I draw that. Sometimes I just draw myself making a phone call, or looking pensively at a piece of wood, or whatever the first order of business may be.
double Blind contour blog post_3So, duh, it just ends up being a bunch of squiggledy lines. But, by the time I open my eyes, something miraculous has happened. I have a clearer view of what I’m about to start. I know a little more about where it’s headed. I have already taken the first step, completely risk free. And you know what? The fear is gone, because I tricked some little part of me into believing that this thing I have to do is safe and known – because I’ve already drawn it and absolutely nobody died.
double Blind contour blog post_2

So I offer to you, next time you’re in doubt, put your pencil on your page, close your eyes and imagine what you need to do. Picture the completed task or yourself in the middle of it. Draw that. Be as loose or as detailed as you wish. After a couple minutes open your eyes and laugh at your drawing, then leap into action.

Like me, you will probably end up with a handsome little pile of nonsense drawings, but you might also end up with enough peace to start your day.double Blind contour blog post_1

On getting my work to ask the hard questions:

The other week at an opening there were a number of you who said “I can feel the conflict between industry and nature in your work.” This, in its way, made me sad, for in making the work I felt a harmonious combining of the two.

But the artist makes only one half of the work. The rest is all you, and I am so privileged to learn your side. It lets me know who you are, the other, and how I can talk to you. To state your thoughts lets my work know you and dialogue back.

Leaf Filled

I noticed – hey – I know now what that person feels about industry/nature. My work asked them that question and I didn’t even know it. I thought I was trying to tell them something. But my work had other plans. It was curious.

Meditation cushion print

A thing that comes up in my reading/listening a lot: the idea of making art based on questions, not answers. Answers and truths are illusory. This is a controversial stance. I’m not placing it as an argument but rather a hypothesis. In my experience, personal truths (are there other kinds?) are transitory.

Seasonal trees block

Out in the people world, I find it difficult sometimes to talk to people about — people things. I’m not very good at it. I mean about families, spouses, heartbreaks, haircuts, injuries. These are relevant and important, but I am private in ways and just not very good at sharing back.

On the other hand, I am crazy to learn what projects/ideas/innovations/science/stories/techniques/places/spaces/perspectives/mind-tricks keep you awake at night. You know what? Sometimes its really hard to get people into those conversations. I learned a secret pass-phrase to get right in there, but some things are just tricky.

decal blocking x 2

So I’ll get my art to do it. Then go places with it. It’ll be my wingman.

Hey guy, my art says. Quick, what do I make you think of? Wear it all over your face.