Astral Ink

Astral Ink Quilt - Allison Green_8Astral Ink
Silk face, polyester interior, canvas backing. Various threads including metallics and variegated. 48″ x 36″.
© Allison Green 2013.

Silk painting with Procion dyes, free-motion quilting to within 1/2″. Designed after a photograph of ink swirling around with textile medium. This is a commentary on the mixing pot that is space, and the fluidity of time.

See how it was constructed.
Previously displayed at M&T Deli. Pricing available upon request.

Astral Ink Quilt - Allison Green_5 Astral Ink Quilt - Allison Green_3

Silk circuit

silk circuit copySilk Circuit
Silk face, polyester interior, cotton backing. Various threads including metallics. 20″ x 16″ © Allison Green 2013.

Silk painting with Procion dyes, machine quilted to within 1/2″. Based on a circuit board. Exploring the idea of beauty in industry, and the relationship between textiles and technology.

See how it was constructed: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3
Sold throughM&T Deli in Fredericton, NB.

silk circuit_8 copy Silk Circuit

The makings of rust.

You lovely folk have helped me to choose the Train Bridge photograph for my auction textile. I was so impressed by voter turn-out, thanks a ton! I’ve re-coloured it a little, and given it symmetry. While I enjoyed the bluish twilight tinge, it took away the rust colour that I love.

I’ve printed it off in sections to 32×16, which I will now stick to cardboard. Then I’ll x-acto out each little piece of bridge to use as pattern for cutting the cloth.

I was going to use fabric I had around the house, but looking at the lovely colour variation in the wood and metal I realized it should really be hand-dyed. Fabricville was having a great sale yesterday so I slipped out and bought a collection of dyeable neutrals. Cotton, linen, canvas, muslin. Natural materials feel so nice on the skin.

Since my favourite thing about that bridge is its rusty rusty surface, I’ve been thinking I’d try to dye its rafters with actual rust. Been checking out some different tutorials. This one looks real promising if I can find the ferrous sulfate. Her shibori is beautiful, I love the blue/grey iron variant:

Artstitches: Rust Solution Dyeing Tutorial.

Today I went to the college for a little while. I was talking to the co-ordinator for the Nature Trust exhibit we are having in October. They’ve decided the title will be Nature of Art/Art of Nature. And apparently it will be held at the New Brunswick Museum in Saint John (that’s a big deal!!) and then coming here to Fredericton. I’ve been getting ideas in my sleep for this project, something along the lines of a multi-tiered puzzle (could I be more vague?).

We can pay to use our school’s amenities during the summer, how cool is that? I took pictures of my 3D work from this year in the little photo studio, so I’ll be able to take you on a walk-through of some of my final projects in the coming days.

Alright, I’m off to spend the day in the sun and the evening in a pile of cloth!

Physical felt.

Made some neat felt samples last week. I love felting class. It’s really a full-body art form. Your arms are so tough by the end of the day and you have so much texture to show for it!

This one was a secondary fibre sample, a variety of different wools, silks, I can’t even remember what all. It is coloured with acidwash dyes in island blue.

And so with this one. As you can see the colour is very uneven, by design. This is accomplished by putting very little water in your dye pot, stirring it not at all, and never letting it boil too robustly. Oh, and it’s best if you use a dye that is a mix of many colours, like chestnut, plum, and island blue. This causes the dye to split in the pot and you get a whole collection of colours on your felt.

This next little guy is the product of resist felting. You put down a couple layers of wool, then a bit of bubble wrap, then more wool, then more bubble wrap, until you have a nice little tumour. Then you rub rub rub until it’s nice and felty.

Then you cut open all the layers of your lovely little boil, and pull out the bubble wrap. It practically jumps out at you! The felt shrinks around it and so it gets all balled up in there : ) This one has some plastic mesh in one of the layers. Wouldn’t it look cool with a big marble in that hole?

This one has nylons felted in. Yes, nylons as in pantyhosen. It has just a tiny bit of sparkle and a bubbly monster skin effect.

This next one uses polyester organza, and has beautiful dimpling. This happens when you felt into secondary structures like porous fabrics. As you felt the barbs of the wool latch onto your cloth. Then as the felt shrinks, it gathers the cloth along with it. I dyed this piece later and was shocked that the polyester took the colour. I knew acidwash would dye nylon but not this kind of thing. Super cool.

I also biffed this silk hankie in on top of my chestnut dye pot when I was colouring the resist pieces above. While they came out brown and green, this guy ended up mustard and navy blue. Just goes to show the number of colours that go into that dye.

Our next project for that class is a scarf inspired by a photograph of a sky. I chose a nebula. Specifically this nebula (found here).

Thinking about trying to felt in some glass bits for the stars. We shall see how that works out. Little behind on the schoolwork what with finishing off the light fixture masterpiece, but c’est la vie. I have only exciting projects left so it won’t take a whole lot of motivation : )

When nature overtakes architecture

Today was an extended and entirely pleasant day in the surface design studio. Many people around, some sort of open house to publicize the school and they were all very inquisitive. I was working away on some screen printing, texture samples, and a cityscape while the lady at the table across made encaustic board games. I spent the whole day intoxicated by the smell of beeswax. Could there be a more sticky drug? Teehee.

Here are the beginnings of my salt crystal cityscape. I left it at the school to grow (far too fragile for frolicking) and am chomping at the bit to go check on it. I suspect it will be half way to full-grown by the time I wake up. Probably make some coffee related excuse to go downtown and see it first thing.

Step One: Fabricate a cardboard city. Massacre it (and your hands) with food colouring, everyone`s favourite multi-medium.

Step Two: Flood your city with a foul-smelling blue concoction (recipe courtesy Mik3 at Instructables).

Step Three: Wait for the magic! I made this tester in advance so the suspense wouldn’t kill me. It makes me think of what skyscrapers might look like if all the people left and nature reclaimed its territory.

Also, I couldn’t be more satisfied with my dinosaur prints. Hooray for discharge paste! Here are the first couple bags. Need a little embellishment yet. Maybe some zigzag stitching and a button or two.

Time for sleep, more projects tomorrow :)

– Allison Green