Nymph.

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I have to say this one is my favourite. It went along swimmingly at every stage. My first step was to draw the dress design, then create a life-size paper mock-up. You can see them side by side:

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The next step was to make this into a pattern. I chopped up the mock-up and recreated it with layers of cotton and interfacing.

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But I didn’t use just any cotton. These patterns I digitally designed using close-up scans of leaves. The day they arrived from Spoonflower and I opened up the package: magical.

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The next piece in the collection is Nymph, the juvenile insect. It is very closely inspired by the stunning patterns of the dragonfly larva, as seen in the charming book “Zoom in on Nature”:

Each piece of the carapace is separate and self-contained, so that they overlap like armour. Once they were all machine stitched into plates I pinned them on the dressform using my meticulous photo-records:

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I hand sewed them all to each other. It was at this point I realized two things: I am really glad I didn’t make this out of stiffer cloth, and I really really need to buy a thimble. Stabbed fingers aside, I love the control of hand sewing, and it went along a lot quicker than I had imagined. I wouldn’t begin to know how to accomplish this on a machine.

If you didn’t get to see this lovely lady in Saint John, she will be making an appearance in Fredericton! I have the luck of taking part in the bi-annual show for the Textile Dept. at the NB College of Craft and Design. A lot of really incredible designers come out of there every year, you don’t want to miss it. Check out the last one if you don’t believe me!

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See you at the opening in The Gallery at NBCCD tomorrow evening (Feb 6) at 4:30 – 6pm.

Nymph

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Nymph
Original digitally printed cotton from leaf photographs, cotton, corduroy, interfacing, reed.
Size small dress © Allison Green 2013.

The second piece in the Time Flies Collection, this dress shows the burgeoning juvenile insect. It is designed after the dragonfly nymph.

See how it was constructed, and the other items in the series: Nascent, Nubile, and Nesting.
Exhibited with Foundation at the Saint John Arts Centre, Saint John, NB.
Pricing available upon request.

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Topecol

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Topecol
Silk and fishing line. 40″ x 12″ x 12″.
© Allison Green 2012, Photos © Jeff Crawford 2012

Textile installation featuring dangling silk with photo-transfer. This piece follows the contours of the topographical map of Minister’s Face preserve on Long Island, New Brunswick. Printed on the surface are photographs of its thriving ecology. The different segments of the ecosystem are inextricably linked. Just like elevations on a map, removing just one slice would completely alter the whole.

On display at the NB Museum in Saint John as part of the Nature of Art of Nature exhibit for the Nature Trust of New Brunswick. Exhibit reopening at UNB Art Centre in Fredericton April 12, 2013.

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The Point

The Point “The Point” Cotton, polyester, snaps. 20″ x 20″ (open). © Allison Green 2012 Softbook presenting the similarities between different domains of science. The segments represent (clockwise from bottom): astronomy, neurobiology, botany, cellular biology, genetics, crystallography, chemistry, and atomic physics. Alternative triangular shape, opens flat to hang. Digitally printed and composed using scanned acrylic samples and text from vintage science books. Included in a testimonial on the NBCCD website. The Point detail